Abstract

The rise to power of Donald Trump has been shocking in many ways. One of these was that it disrupted the preexisting consensus that overt racism would be death to a national political campaign. In this paper, I argue that Trump made use of what I call "racial figleaves"—additional utterances that provide just enough cover to give reassurance to voters who are racially resentful but don't wish to see themselves as racist. These figleaves also, I argue, play a key role in shifting our norms about what counts as racist: they bring it about that something which would previously have been seen as revealing obvious racism is now seen as the sort of thing that a nonracist might say. This gives them tremendous power to corrupt not just our political discourse but our culture more broadly.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2154-154X
Print ISSN
0276-2080
Pages
pp. 91-116
Launched on MUSE
2017-10-18
Open Access
No
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