Abstract

Abstract:

The American Music Show, an Atlanta cable public access television show that ran from 1981 to 2005, is not only a forgotten piece of production history but also a fertile case study. This article—situated in both local Atlanta and national cable access contexts in which the show began—uses the tools of production studies to construct a microhistory of local cable access, analyzing the hopes, ideals, ethos, and actual production practices that surrounded the show. The producers of The American Music Show reflect on their work in the initial years of the show as creatively avant-garde but ultimately limited within the commercial structures of television. It is that tension that has enabled them to claim part of the show's symbolic capital.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2578-4919
Print ISSN
2578-4900
Pages
pp. 1-24
Launched on MUSE
2017-10-17
Open Access
No
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