This is a preprint
American Studies in Review: Food, Museums, and Cultural Heritage Sites
In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

American Studies in Review Food, Museums, and Cultural Heritage Sites Ronda L. Brulotte and Michael A. Di Giovine, eds., Edible Identities: Food as Cultural Heritage. Surrey: Ashgate, 2014. 252 pp. Nina Levent and Irina D. Mihalache, eds., Food and Museums. London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2016. 384 pp. Michelle Moon, Interpreting Food at Museums and Historic Sites. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2016. 220 pp. Reviewed by Tanfer Emin Tunc Abstract: Over the past decade or so, the study of food museums has emerged out of larger disciplines such as food studies, memory studies, museology, hospitality management, culinary tourism, and travel and leisure studies as its own area of inquiry. Food museums have existed for decades, but are increasing in popularity in the United States and globally, both as places to visit and as venues of study. Food museums play a significant role in the preservation of culinary culture, history, and identity, particularly because they are concerned with terroir. They focus on the origins of the products we consume; the objects, rituals, and sites of food and drink cultivation, preparation, and presentation; and the places where we sell and eat food. This review article presents a sampling of some of the most recent publications in the interdisciplinary area of food museum studies. Keywords: food, museums, cultural heritage, historic sites, culinary tourism Résumé : Depuis une dizaine d’années, l’étude des musées de l’alimentation s’est émancipée de disciplines plus générales telles que les études sur l’alimentation, les études sur la mémoire, la muséologie, la gestion de l’hospitalité, le tourisme culinaire et le tourisme et les loisirs pour définir son propre champ d’investigation. Les musées consacrés à l’alimentation, qui existent depuis longtemps, deviennent de plus en plus populaires aux États-Unis et dans le monde, à la fois comme lieux touristiques et comme 6 Canadian Review of American Studies/Revue canadienne d’études américaines ahead of print article doi: 10.3138/cras.2017.021 This ahead of print version may differ slightly from the final published version. lieux à comprendre. S’ils jouent un rôle important dans la sauvegarde de la culture, de l’histoire et de l’identité culinaires, c’est, en particulier, parce qu’ils se préoccupent du terroir. Ils mettent en avant les origines des produits que nous consommons ; les objets, les rituels et les sites de la culture, de la préparation et de la présentation des aliments et des boissons ; de même que les endroits où nous vendons et mangeons les aliments. Cet article passe en revue quelques-unes des plus récentes publications de ce domaine multidisciplinaire que forment les études sur les musées de l’alimentation. Mots clés : nourriture, musées, patrimoine culturel, sites historiques, tourisme culinaire Over the past decade or so, the study of food museums has emerged out of larger disciplines such as food studies, memory studies, museology, hospitality management, culinary tourism, and travel and leisure studies as its own area of inquiry (Everett 1–2). Food museums have existed for decades, but are increasing in popularity in the United States and globally, both as places to visit and as venues of study. This is connected to the growing food heritage movement, as well as to the expanding interest in the culinary arts through gastro-tourism, food writing, food blogs and apps, television shows and channels devoted to food, magazines, cookbooks, the push toward conscious consumption, the ‘‘foodie’’ lifestyle, and the provenance of American culinary traditions (Lohman xv–xviii). As Ruth Reichl conveys, ‘‘the less we cook, the more we read about food,’’ and the more interest we express in anything food related—from designer batteries de cuisine (which may never be used but look attractive in custom-made status kitchens) to exotic gourmet ingredients—as if ‘‘we are desperate to reconnect in the only way we can’’ (xxiv). However, members of the food heritage movement maintain that there is much more at stake than simply reconnecting. They believe that as America severs its ties to the foodways of the past, it...


pdf