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  • Reviewers

James Eli Adams (jea2139@columbia.edu) teaches at Columbia University. He is the author of Dandies and Desert Saints: Styles of Victorian Masculinity (1995), A History of Victorian Literature (2009), and, most recently, “The Trouble with Angels: Dickens, Gender, and Sexuality” in the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of Charles Dickens. He is still thinking about inheritance.

Katherine J. Anderson (kajander@ucdavis.edu) is Lecturer of English and Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies at the University of California, Davis. Her work appears in Victorian Review and the forthcoming Traumatic Tales: British Nationhood and National Trauma in Nineteenth-Century Literature, edited by Lisa Kasmer. She is completing a book manuscript entitled “Twisted Words: Rhetorics of Torture in Imperial Britain, 1850–1915.”

Barbara Brookes (barbara.brookes@otago.ac.nz) is Professor of History at the University of Otago. Her most recent books include A History of New Zealand Women (2016) and a co-edited international collection with Tracy Penny Light and Wendy Mitchinson, Bodily Subjects: Essays on Gender and Health, 1800–2000 (2014). She has published widely on gender relations and the history of sickness and health.

Marina Carter (Marina.Carter@ed.ac.uk) is currently working on the AHRC funded “Becoming Coolies” project at the University of Edinburgh. Among her recent publications is Mutiny at the Margins: New Perspectives on the Indian Uprising of 1857, Volume 3: Global Perspectives (2013), which she edited with Crispin Bates.

Mary Christian (chrismae@umail.iu.edu) is Assistant Professor of English at Middle Georgia State University. Her research focuses on representations of marriage and gender roles in nineteenth-century drama, and her work has appeared in Theatre Survey, Religion and Literature, and SHAW: The Journal of Bernard Shaw Studies. She is also Membership Secretary for the International Shaw Society.

Julie Codell (julie.codell@asu.edu) is Professor of Art History at Arizona State University, and Affiliate Faculty in Film, English, Gender, and Asian Studies. She wrote The Victorian Artist: Artists’ Life Writing in Britain, c. 1870–1910 (2003; rev. paperback ed. 2012), edited Transculturation in British Art, 1770–1930 (2012); Power and Resistance: The Delhi Coronation Durbars (2012); The Political Economy of Art: Making the Nation of Culture (2008); Imperial Co-Histories: National Identity and the British and Colonial Press (2003); and co-edited Replication in the Long Nineteenth Century (2018); Orientalism, Eroticism and Modern Visuality in Global Cultures (2016); Encounters in the Victorian Press: Editors, Authors, Readers (2005); and Orientalism Transposed: The Impact of the Colonies on British Culture (1998).

Annmarie Drury (annmarie.drury@qc.cuny.edu) is Associate Professor of English at Queens College, CUNY. She is the author of Translation as Transformation in Victorian Poetry (2015) and the translator and editor of Stray Truths: Selected Poems of Euphrase Kezilahabi (2015). [End Page 570]

Aidan Forth (aforth@luc.edu) is Assistant Professor of British Imperial History at Loyola University, Chicago. He is the author of Barbed-Wire Imperialism: Britain’s Empire of Camps, 1876–1903 (2017) as well as articles in the Journal of Modern European History and Kritika on the development of “concentration camps” and “refugee camps” in the British Empire.

Simon Goldhill (Sdg1001@cam.ac.uk) is Professor of Greek at the University of Cambridge. His book Victorian Culture and Classical Antiquity: Art, Opera, Fiction and the Proclamation of Modernity (2011) won the Robert Lowry Prize for the best book on Victorian Literature in 2012. His most recent books include The Buried Life of Things: How Objects Made History in Nineteenth-Century Britain (2015) and A Very Queer Family Indeed: Sex, Religion and the Bensons in Victorian Britain (2016).

Laura Green (la.green@northeastern.edu) is Professor of English and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Northeastern University. She is the author of Educating Women: Cultural Conflict and Victorian Literature (2001) and Literary Identification from Charlotte Brontë to Tsitsi Dangarembga (2012).

Carrie Sickmann Han (csickman@iupui.edu) is Visiting Assistant Professor at Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis, where she teaches Nineteenth-Century British Fiction and Children’s/Young Adult Literature. Her research focuses on adaptations...

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2052
Print ISSN
0042-5222
Pages
pp. 570-573
Launched on MUSE
2017-09-21
Open Access
No
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