About the Authors
In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

About the Authors

Charlotte Blease is a Research Fellow at the University of Leeds supported by ISSF Wellcome Trust Research Funding and Research Affiliate at the Program in Placebo Studies, Harvard Medical School. She researches the philosophy and psychology of patient-practitioner encounters. She can be contacted at charlotteblease@gmail.com.

Tamara Kayali Browne is a Lecturer in Health Ethics and Professionalism at Deakin University, Australia. She completed her PhD at the University of Cambridge. Her book, Depression and the Self: Meaning, Control and Authenticity, will be published with Cambridge University Press in 2018. She is the author of several papers on the ethics of sex selection and the philosophy of psychiatry, which are collected at https://deakin.academia.edu/TamaraKayaliBrowne. She can be contacted at tamara.browne@deakin.edu.au

Havi Carel is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Bristol, where she also teaches medical students. She is currently a Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator, leading a five year project, the Life of Breath (www.lifeofbreath.org). Her third monograph was published by Oxford University Press in 2016, entitled Phenomenology of Illness. She can be contacted at havi.carel@bristol.ac.uk.

Rachel Cooper is a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at Lancaster University, UK. Her publications include Diagnosing the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Karnac, 2014), Psychiatry and the Philosophy of Science (2007, Acumen), and Classifying Madness (Springer, 2005). She can be contacted at r.v.cooper@lancaster.ac.uk.

Giuseppe Butera is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Providence College. He has written on Thomas Aquinas's virtue ethics, philosophical psychology, and natural law. He is a member of the American Catholic Philosophical Association and General Editor of the American Maritain Association's Books Series. He can be contacted at gbutera@providence.edu.

Valerie Gray Hardcastle is Professor of Philosophy, Psychology, and Psychiatry & Behavioral Neuroscience and Scholar-in-Residence at the Weaver Institute for Law and Psychiatry at the University of Cincinnati. An internationally recognized scholar, Valerie is the author of five books and over 130 essays. She studies the nature and structure of interdisciplinary theories in the cognitive sciences and has focused primarily on developing a philosophical framework for understanding conscious phenomena responsive to neuroscientific, psychiatric, and psychological data. Currently, she is investigating the neuroscience of violence and its implications for both our understanding of human nature and the criminal justice system. She can be contacted at valerie.hardcastle@uc.edu. [End Page 283]

Warren Kinghorn is Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Pastoral and Moral Theology at Duke University Medical Center and Duke Divinity School. His recent publications include "Moral Engagement, Combat Trauma, and the Lure of Psychiatric Dualism: Why Psychiatry is More than a Technical Discipline," Harvard Review of Psychiatry 2015;23:28-37. He can be contacted at warren.kinghorn@duke.edu.

Paul Lieberman is a psychiatrist in Providence, Rhode Island where he works in an acute partial hospital and has an outpatient practice. His interests are in philosophy of psychiatry, especially the analysis of psychological concepts and ethics, and in outcomes of psychiatric treatment. He can be contacted at paul_lieberman@brown.edu.

Jon F. Merz is Associate Professor in the Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. His teaching and research is at the intersection of law, bioethics, and policy, with special emphasis on the ethics of science and research. He may be contacted at merz@upenn.edu.

Gavin Miller is Senior Lecturer in Medical Humanities at the University of Glasgow, where he co-directs the Medical Humanities Research Centre. His research interests include the critical history of psychiatry, science fiction and medicine, the cultural authority of the medical profession, and cultural psychiatry. His recent articles include "Psychiatric penguins: writing on psychiatry for Penguin Books Ltd, c.1950-c.1980" in History of the Human Sciences and "Is the agenda for global mental health a form of cultural imperialism?" in Medical Humanities. He can be contacted at gavin.miller@glasgow.ac.uk.

Alexandra Pârvan is Assistant Professor, Department...