Abstract

Abstract:

In A Case for Irony, Jonathan Lear aims to advance "a distinguished philosophical tradition that conceives of humanity as a task." I suggest that Elena Ferrante's The Lost Daughter illustrates the mode of ironic experience that interests Lear, and helps us assess his relation to a key contemporary proponent of this tradition—Christine Korsgaard. I explain why Lear's account of the phenomenology of ironic experience relies on Korsgaard's conception of practical thinking, but argue that he must reject her idea that reasons for action come from "practical identities" in order to make good on his conception of irony as radical reflection.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-329X
Print ISSN
0190-0013
Pages
pp. 185-200
Launched on MUSE
2017-07-05
Open Access
No
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