Words of Witness: Black Women's Autobiography in the Post-Brown Era by Angela Ann Ards (review)
In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

Angela Ann Ards, Words of Witness: Black Women's Autobiography in the Post-Brown Era (Madison, WI: The University of Wisconsin Press, 2015), 230 pp.

The long tradition of black life writing dates back to early slave narratives, in which authors wove together personal testimony and political analysis in order to situate themselves as speaking subjects against the silencing mechanisms of slavery. The "ethics of self-fashioning" at work in the creation of such narratives is the focus of Angela Ards's book. Words of Witness examines the autobiographical texts of Melba Beal, Rosemary Bray, June Jordan, Edwidge Danticat, and Eisa Davis against the backdrop of the landmark Brown v. Board of Education ruling, not to situate these testimonies in an imagined post-civil rights era, but rather to explore their engagement with twentieth-century political movements. Ards's attentiveness to genre allows her to weave a rich tapestry of stories that bear testimony to black women's fashioning of the self as both a personal and a political endeavor. [End Page 83]

...