Wonder Woman: Warbringer by Leigh Bardugo (review)
In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

Reviewed by
Kate Quealy-Gainer, Assistant Editor
Bardugo, Leigh Wonder Woman: Warbringer. Random House, 2017[384p] (DC Icons)
Library ed. ISBN 978-0-399-54974-8 $21.99
Trade ed. ISBN 978-0-399-54973-1 $18.99
E-book ed. ISBN 978-0-399-54975-5 $10.99
Reviewed from galleys R Gr. 7–10

Among her immortal Amazon sisters on the island of Themyscira, Diana is somewhat of a runt, untested in battle and untrusted to be the next queen. When she saves a mortal from an explosion at sea by secretly bringing the girl to the island against the rules, the effects are immediate and devastating, with the island shaking with earthquakes and fever spreading. The Oracle tells Diana that she must get Alia away from their home and that if Diana follows the girl into the mortal world, she’ll either find great glory or death. Desperate to win her sisters’ respect, she goes with Alia only to realize her she’s leapt from the frying pan into the fire: Alia is a Warbringer, a descendent of Helen of Troy, and upon the next new moon, the world will fall into brutal warfare unless Diana can find a way to cleanse Alia of her Warbringer blood. Fans of Wonder Woman in any of her comic book or film iterations will have plenty of fun here, spotting references both familiar and obscure, and Diana’s bold ferocity leads to both moments of heroism and hilarity in the mortal world, especially when she’s confronting sexism (throwing some serious shade at a harasser and subsequently breaking his finger). The connection between Diana and Alia is the beating heart of this story, as both girls struggle with the expectations of their siblings (Alia’s brother is overprotective to the point of obsession) and bond over being made to feel small. Wonder Woman is the epitome of a kick-butt heroine, and Bardugo does her justice with aplomb.

...