Abstract

ABSTRACT:

Following decades of postcolonial dictatorships and authoritarianism, many African countries have experienced expanded efforts by transnational organizations—from both top down and bottom up—aimed at alleviating poverty and improving security. This article provides a partial inventory of such efforts in Somalia following the collapse of the state in 1991, and suggests the need for better coordination between state and non-state transnational initiatives. Methodologically, the article combines discussion of the underlying causes of poverty and insecurity in Somalia with the presentation of empirical cases based on data collected among the Somali diaspora and in Somalia (Mogadishu, Hargeisa, and Borama) in 2010–15.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1535-6574
Print ISSN
0740-9133
Pages
pp. 97-128
Launched on MUSE
2017-03-18
Open Access
No
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