Abstract

This article draws on lessons from the Bracero Program to examine the problematic ideologies of race and citizenship that circulate in the alternative food movement today. It argues that a worker-centered transnational solidarity movement will better address the inequities and vulnerabilities that farmworkers continue to face than the conscious consumerism of the alternative food movement with its racialized discourse of Jeffersonian agriculture and its neoliberal investment in anti-obesity rhetoric.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2471-1039
Print ISSN
1090-4972
Pages
pp. 63-68
Launched on MUSE
2017-03-17
Open Access
No
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