Abstract

Stanley Cavell’s memoir, Little Did I Know, ends with an enigmatic conversation at his father’s hospital bedside entitled “To put away—perhaps not to discard—childish things.” Published responses to Little Did I Know have left the ending unexamined, which means we are still some distance from understanding the book as a whole. In this essay I read the ending alongside several other key episodes in the text as “scenes of instruction,” a term essential to Cavell’s account of Wittgenstein. Doing so helps make sense not just of the memoir but of its place in Cavell’s work.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-329X
Print ISSN
0190-0013
Pages
pp. 465-479
Launched on MUSE
2017-02-23
Open Access
No
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