Abstract

H. D.’s prose novel Asphodel has often been discussed in terms of its codes of lesbian desire. A posthumanist lens, however, can instead illuminate the ways that informational code operates throughout the novel. In this article, I use N. Katherine Hayles’s theories on the dialectics of pattern/randomness to parse how Asphodel’s Hermione engages in a machinic identity with Morse code’s technologies and universal language. Although this language ultimately fails, it nonetheless becomes a heteroglossia that allows Hermione to communicate and express herself in varied ways. I thus posit that, in using the technologies and literary techniques of the early twentieth century to initiate these engagements, Asphodel exhibits a particularly modernist posthumanism.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6520
Print ISSN
1063-1801
Pages
pp. 89-108
Launched on MUSE
2017-01-18
Open Access
No
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