Abstract

Self-authorship, describing a synthesis of intellectual, intrapersonal, and interpersonal development, remains an evident but elusive goal of college education. I sought to track self-authorship in a racially diverse group of 30 young South African engineering graduates. In discussing their career trajectories, all individuals demonstrated independence and responsibility. Explicit expressions of self-authorship were identified in 9 individuals, and these were analyzed in more detail. The study confirms the central role of dissonant experiences in producing self-authorship and points to the potential role of a demanding academic program such as engineering. Furthermore, the study also extends the emerging findings regarding the prevalence of self-authorship among graduates of color.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1543-3382
Print ISSN
0897-5264
Pages
pp. 863-879
Launched on MUSE
2016-11-09
Open Access
No
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