Abstract

Abstract:

In Michael Ondaatje’s The English Patient, Almásy attempts to remove himself from the world and the consequences of his actions by concealing his identity and hiding his personal history. However, the revelation of Almásy’s story drives the novel, pitting the reader’s desire for knowledge, furthered by the actions of Caravaggio, against Almásy’s desire for anonymity. As Jean-Paul Sartre argues, individuals must take responsibility for their choices because those choices have consequences. Drawing on Sartre’s insight, I explore Almásy’s culpability for his actions and denial of personal responsibility—and the culpability of those who force him to reveal his story.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1086-329X
Print ISSN
0190-0013
Pages
pp. 356-363
Launched on MUSE
2016-04-28
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.