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  • Contributors

DAVID GREVEN
is Professor of English at the University of South Carolina. He is the author of several books, including Gender Protest and Same-Sex Desire in Antebellum American Literature (Ashgate, 2014), Ghost Faces: Hollywood and Post-Millennial Masculinity (SUNY Press, 2016), and Intimate Violence: Hitchcock, Sex, and Queer Theory (Oxford UP, forthcoming).

MATTHEW REDMOND
is a doctoral candidate in the English Department at Stanford University. With the support of a SSHRC Doctoral Scholarship, he currently researches transatlantic influence and intertext in nineteenth-century literature, focusing particularly on Dickens’ stature in antebellum America. Matthew has also contributed to The Bull Calf, an online review of contemporary Canadian fiction, poetry, and criticism.

ROBERT YUSEF RABIEE
is an Anna Arnold Bing Ph.D. Fellow in English at the University of Southern California. His book project, “Medieval America: Feudalism and Liberalism in Nineteenth-Century U.S. Literature,” explores how residual feudal laws and medievalist literary productions shaped U.S. politics and culture in the first half of the nineteenth century. [End Page 234]

Provocations Contributors

THOMAS HALLOCK
is an associate professor of English, and ex-department chair, at the University of South Florida, St. Petersburg. His publications include From the Fallen Tree: Frontier Narratives, Environmental Politics and the Roots of a National Pastoral (U North Carolina P) and William Bartram, the Search for Nature’s Design: Selected Letters, Art and Unpublished Writings (U Georgia P). “‘A’ is for Acronym” is from a book in progress called A Road Course in American Literature (www.roadcourse.us).

SARI EDELSTEIN
is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. She is the author of Between the Novel and the News: The Emergence of American Women’s Writing (2014), and her essays have appeared in American Literature, Legacy, and Studies in American Fiction. She is writing a book about nineteenth-century American cultures of age and literary treatments of maturity and maturation. [End Page 235]

Year in Conferences Contributors

DIRECTOR: MARLOWE DALY-GALEANO
is Assistant Professor of English at Lewis-Clark State College where she teaches courses in American literature and humanities. She first participated in YiC as a graduate student covering ALA. She is passionate about YiC as a platform for sharing new research, mentoring, and forming scholarly networks. This is her third year as YiC Director.

MLA

DANIEL GRACE
is a PhD candidate at UC Davis. His dissertation in progress (working title: “Guided Passages”) explores the confluence in nineteenth-century U.S. literature and culture between, on the one hand, the mass circulation of allegorical accounts of spiritual progress understood through the metaphor of travel, and, on the other, the historical rise of travel writing and mass tourism.

BOB HODGES
is a PhD candidate in nineteenth-century U.S. literature as well as critical theory at the University of Washington where he is the 2015-2016 Kollar Endowed Fellow. His reviews have appeared or are forthcoming in the Poe Review and Clues. He has presented at conferences in the U.S. and Canada.

KELLY PAYNE
is a doctoral candidate and lecturer in Nineteenth-Century American literature at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Her research focuses on the intersections of economics and race in national genealogies contested in antislavery fiction from 1826-1877. Other research interests include critical [End Page 236] university studies, humanities education and professional student identities, and literary mixed-race studies. In addition to her doctoral work, Kelly serves as the UNL Dept. of English academic advisor.

EMILY WAPLES
is a PhD Candidate in English at the University of Michigan, where she is a 2015-2016 Graduate Fellow at the Institute for the Humanities. Her scholarship has appeared in the journals Gothic Studies, Configurations, and Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature, and is forthcoming in the Critical Insights series on Louisa May Alcott.

SENIOR ADVISOR: MANUEL HERRERO-PUERTAS
is a Public Humanities Fellow and PhD candidate in English at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His current project tracks how nationalist figurations of disability enabled nineteenth-century Americans to imagine ideal futures that emanated from an unaltered historical present involving slavery, Indian removal, and secession. His work has appeared in American Quarterly and ATLANTIS.

ALA

LUCAS DIETRICH
earned his PhD in...

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Additional Information

ISSN
1935-021X
Print ISSN
0093-8297
Pages
pp. 234-241
Launched on MUSE
2016-03-26
Open Access
No
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