Abstract

William Blake denigrates visual experience, and sensory experience generally, as incapable of yielding genuine insight. Yet he cites his own “visions” as sources of spiritual insight. How does he conceive of visions such that they escape the limitations of the sensory? I argue that he has a coherent solution to this problem, combining an empiricist view of sense experience with an antiempiricist view of experience in general.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-329X
Print ISSN
0190-0013
Pages
pp. A317-A325
Launched on MUSE
2016-03-23
Open Access
No
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