Abstract

Does a fictional story imply a fictional world in which that story takes place? Critiquing Monroe Beardsley and Roman ingarden, Ruth Lorand argues that conflating a story with its world collapses the distinction between the story’s foreground and background. The Kantian tradition, especially the philosophy of Hannah Arendt, instead shows that a world is what gives every representation its implicit background—its character of having additional details ready to be told. I show that a fictional story does necessarily take place in a fictional world; however, a fictional world differs from the real world in that its background remains essentially indeterminate.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-329X
Print ISSN
0190-0013
Pages
pp. A16-A31
Launched on MUSE
2016-03-23
Open Access
No
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