Abstract

This meditative essay considers what it might mean to “read” text and terrain comparatively, attending to the nuances of poetic and environmental form that shape experience. I explore this notion through a sensorial reading of a thirty-five-acre plot of land in rural Virginia, alongside three poems by American poet Charles Wright, “Sitting Outside at the End of Autumn,” “Lines After Rereading T. S. Eliot,” and “Reading Lao Tzu Again in the New Year.” Examining place in dialogue with poem, I explore how physical and formal elements in both terrains can produce parallel aesthetic, bodily, and emotional effects and resonances.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1086-329X
Print ISSN
0190-0013
Pages
pp. 219-232
Launched on MUSE
2015-09-30
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.