Abstract

This article examines Kennedy’s Tory Democracy and other works and details his underestimated role in shaping Anglophone literary modernism. In Kennedy’s view the fundamental error of liberalism is that it misunderstands human nature and hence the process of history, that the choice should be Burke’s conservatism, with its emphasis on order and stability, over Mill’s liberalism, which leads to disunion and anarchy. The discussion argues that Kennedy’s conservatism leads to a better understanding of early twentieth-century political aesthetics, a “classicist” brand of modernism, employing the Romanticism/Classicism distinction in terms very close to those of T. E. Hulme and T. S. Eliot, but Kennedy’s is as early as January 1909. [109 words]

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Additional Information

ISSN
1559-2715
Print ISSN
0013-8339
Pages
pp. 385-402
Launched on MUSE
2015-05-29
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Archived
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