Abstract

This essay argues that Walter Benjamin’s One-Way Street offers readers a way of being historical that resists and redirects the meaning and significance of dominant symbols and personal experiences. In the interaction among its entries, it also tries to stimulate the growth of those capacities required by projects of social transformation. In Benjamin’s text, “form” is thus less a matter of literary organization than a potentially exemplary mode of political action.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-329X
Print ISSN
0190-0013
Pages
pp. 395-415
Launched on MUSE
2015-02-19
Open Access
No
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