Abstract

This article analyzes the ballet dancer’s pointe shoe as a technology of artistic production and bodily discipline. Drawing on oral histories, memoirs, dance journals, advertisements, and other archival materials, it demonstrates that the shoe utilized by dancers at George Balanchine’s New York City Ballet was not the quintessentially Romantic entity it is so often presumed to be. Instead, it emerged from uniquely twentieth-century systems of labor and production, and it was used to alter dancers’ bodies and professional lives in particularly modern ways. The article explores not only the substance of these changes but also the ways in which Balanchine’s artistic oeuvre was inextricably intertwined with the material technologies he employed and, more broadly, how the history of technology and the history of dance can productively inform one another. Fundamentally, this article recasts Balanchine, seeing him not as a disconnected artist but as an eager participant in the twentieth-century national romance with American technology.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1097-3729
Print ISSN
0040-165X
Pages
pp. 1-27
Launched on MUSE
2015-02-12
Open Access
No
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