Abstract

Critics have long considered the Victorian sensation novel a difficult genre to define. The thread that connects these seemingly disparate works is class: the sensation novel may be defined as a genre that disrupts a middle-class perspective. The sensation novel forces readers to attend to multiple class perspectives; it aligns the act of reading and piecing together clues with the surveillance of a servant; and it revalues femininity while suggesting that what is perceived as gender is actually a function of class privilege.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 835-851
Launched on MUSE
2014-12-01
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.