Abstract

By granting the character of Elinor Dashwood dominance over the narrative function of Sense and Sensibility, Jane Austen is able to solicit the reader’s identification with the Cinderella fantasy of the marriage plot, while at the same time casting doubt on the reliability of this Elinorcentric narrative. Blurring the borders between free indirect discourse and narrative authority, Austen illustrates the fictional quality of both the inner lives of individuals and the agreed truths of an organic social unit.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 773-791
Launched on MUSE
2014-12-01
Open Access
No
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