Abstract

This article explores how influences from the homeland as well as notions of identity, class, and ethical behavior form the Filipino diasporic community. These notions are the filters migrants use to view and understand their relations with host citizens, religious leaders, and employers. By providing an ethnographic account of Filipino migrants in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, this article explores the connection between transnational migration, diaspora, and religion, highlighting the migrants’ exercise of agency, religiosity, and sociality as they construct and inscribe their identity.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2244-1638
Print ISSN
2244-1093
Pages
pp. 445-470
Launched on MUSE
2014-10-10
Open Access
No
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