Abstract

The paucity of criticism on photographic evidence of the Jack the Ripper murders is surprising, particularly given that these images amount to a first-time visual documentation of what are now called sex crimes. This essay attempts to correct this interpretive lag. Through a close analysis of the few Ripper photographs that still survive, I seek to recover the representational codes governing the buried visual, spatial, and gender politics implicated in these photographs. In doing so I challenge the bureaucratic filter of official investigations, police reports, and media reportage that blinds us to the affective dimension of documenting reality.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2052
Print ISSN
0042-5222
Pages
pp. 433-441
Launched on MUSE
2014-09-26
Open Access
No
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