Abstract

Aravind Adiga’s 2008 novel The White Tiger appropriates an animal perspective in order to represent an animalization of the poor that runs counter to popular narratives of India’s economic growth; the novel uncritically deploys an anthropocentric perspective that is premised on the abjection of the animal and the sanctity of the human. At the same time, the narrative’s pivotal moment turns on the Deleuzo-Guattarian becoming-animal of the protagonist. This instance of mutual exposure transgresses humanist boundaries and infects the spaces of the text with a counter-narrative of contagion that suggests a different ethical potential for postcolonial, and posthumanist, representation.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1080-658X
Print ISSN
0026-7724
Pages
pp. 579-598
Launched on MUSE
2014-09-18
Open Access
N
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.