Abstract

This essay considers Charlotte Smith’s treatment of the River Arun in her Elegiac Sonnets, focusing on how the river functions as a metaphor for literary influence and dramatizes her engagement with a range of poetic predecessors and contemporaries. In later editions of her sonnets, the sea replaces the river in importance and inscribes a rather different poetic outlook. In tracing the shift between river and sea, this essay offers a new way of situating and reading Smith’s sonnets as poems frequently celebrated for their innovation. This essay argues that the poems are nonetheless also deeply engaged with the literary past.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 649-674
Launched on MUSE
2014-08-18
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.