Abstract

This essay examines the emergent science of statistics in eighteenth-century Europe as a mode of representation and demonstrates its connections with more conventional literary representations in the period. The essay focuses on two central questions: how statistics, charts, and graphs functioned as modes of representation and what it is they were thought to represent. Statistics and graphs, it is argued, bear significant affinities with some major literary forms in the period, in particular, the novel and the topographical or georgic-descriptive poem. These seemingly disparate representational forms share important features that reflect underlying cultural and epistemological assumptions common to them all.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6636
Print ISSN
0893-5378
Pages
pp. 107-139
Launched on MUSE
2004-04-08
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Ceased Publication
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