Abstract

In Elizabethan England, the term “crown” could signify either a coin or a royal diadem. This duality resonates strongly in Christopher Marlowe’s drama. Whereas contemporary sovereigns’ crowns were said to signify divine monarchical right, Marlowe’s fictional rulers reduce their crowns to objects that can be traded at will: Tamburlaine treats diadems as prizes to be stolen, Dido bribes Aeneas with her regalia, and Edward II offers crowns to his favorites. The crown’s treatment in these plays brings contemporary political ideology into question, as Marlowe interrogates the royal diadem’s reinvention as a marketable commodity.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 259-277
Launched on MUSE
2014-05-15
Open Access
No
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