Abstract

The Merchant of Venice is another of Shakespeare’s Scottish plays in that its examination of Jewishness is simultaneously an examination of Scottishness. The threats of Judaism and Judaizing to the Venetian corporate body find stark echoes in the debates about English and Scottish hegemony during the waning years of Elizabeth’s life. The Merchant of Venice uses pork, among many other tropes, in order to explore this double problem of Jews and Scots. Its anatomy of a contemporary crisis of secession leads us to an entirely new reading of the play’s political, cultural, culinary, and religious stakes.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 315-348
Launched on MUSE
2014-05-15
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.