Abstract

This paper explores the critical reception of Isabelle Holland’s The Man Without a Face (1972), which is one of the first gay-themed young adult novels published in North America and the United Kingdom. Drawing upon Eve Sedgwick’s theorization of shame as an affect related to performance and identity, this paper explores the function of shame in the novel and argues that shame plays a role in gay identifications and ought not to be dismissed as a backward affect.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1918-6983
Print ISSN
0006-7377
Pages
pp. 34-42
Launched on MUSE
2014-03-13
Open Access
N
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