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William Eastlake's Trilogy: The Southwestern Landscape as Truth and Revelation

From: Journal of the Southwest
Volume 49, Number 4, Winter 2007
pp. 561-568 | 10.1353/jsw.2007.0023

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William Eastlake's Trilogy:
The Southwestern Landscape as Truth and Revelation
Francesco Marroni

Francesco Marroni teaches English literature at the University Gabriele D'Annunzio at Pescara.

Notes

1. William Eastlake, “A Long Day's Dying,” Virginia Quarterly Review, 39 (Winter 1963): 64–80. The story was collected in The Best American Short Stories—1964, ed. Martha Foley and David Burnett (Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1964), 109–23.

2. W. C. Bamberger, William Eastlake: High Desert Interlocutor (San Bernardino, CA: Borgo Press, 1993), 37.

3. For a positive interpretation of Eastlake's use and abuse of his own short stories, see Gerard Haslam, William Eastlake (Austin: Steck-Vaughn, 1970). In particular, Haslam notes, “Many of Eastlake's short stories have later appeared as chapters or episodes in his novels. . . . This may appear to be plagiaristic nonsense, but it is, in effect, the product of an artist perfecting his art, for Eastlake works and reworks his material, testing its potential in varied milieus” (11).

4. John O'Brien, “Interview with William Eastlake,” Review of Contemporary Fiction, 3, no. 1 (Spring 1983), 5. Note by the editor: “This interview was conducted at William Eastlake's home in Rio Rico, Arizona, in 1978.”

5. William Eastlake, Portrait of the Artist with Twenty-Six Horses, afterword by Don Graham (1963; reprint Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1980), 204–5.

6. William Eastlake, Go in Beauty, afterword by Delbert E. Wylder (1956; reprint Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1980), 1.

7. In Portrait, Tomas Tomas conveys his idea of circularity to one of his wives in very simple but significant words: “The last time and the first time are really the only time we ever see anything” (34).

8. Haslam, William Eastlake, 29.

9. William Eastlake, The Bronc People, introduction by Gerald Haslam (1958; reprint Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1975), 57.

10. Bamberger, William Eastlake, 41.

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