Abstract

Theodore Dreiser's works, rather than being read as historical artifacts, prove their relevance for a twenty-first-century readership when analyzed alongside contemporary political philosophy. Dreiser's novels are first examined within the rubric of Dominic Fox's "cold world" theory of dysphoric militancy. I argue that the Dreiserian character partially matches Fox's model of the dysphoric militant, falling short only in the final, revolutionary stage. The novels are then examined through the political philosophy of Slavoj Žižek and Alain Badiou, with particular focus on Žižek's idea of historical potentiality and Badiou's critique of law, sin, and love in St. Paul.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-329X
Print ISSN
0190-0013
Pages
pp. 164-178
Launched on MUSE
2013-08-02
Open Access
No
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