Abstract

This qualitative study examines the social interaction patterns among international students at a large research university in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Based on semistructured interviews with 60 international graduate students, the researchers provide a conceptual framework that identifies 4 primary types of social interactions that shape international student experiences at US higher education institutions: self-segregation, exclusive global mixing, inclusive global mixing, and host interaction. The results indicate that conceptions of cultural identity as well as alternative forms of social capital play a crucial role in the formation of international social networks within a university setting.

This qualitative study examines the social interaction patterns among international students at a large research university in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Based on semistructured interviews with 60 international graduate students, the researchers provide a conceptual framework that identifies 4 primary types of social interactions that shape international student experiences at U.S. higher education institutions: self-segregation, exclusive global mixing, inclusive global mixing, and host interaction. The results indicate that conceptions of cultural identity as well as alternative forms of social capital play a crucial role in the formation of international social networks within a university setting.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1543-3382
Print ISSN
0897-5264
Pages
pp. 413-429
Launched on MUSE
2013-07-17
Open Access
No
Archive Status
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