Abstract

This qualitative study explores Black gay male undergraduates' construction of manhood and masculine identity(-ies) as well as how these beliefs affected their academic and social experiences in college. Analyzing in-depth interviews with 29 Black gay male collegians, we found that participants construct and understand manhood and their masculine identities in one of three ways: (a) accepting, adhering to, and performing traditionally masculine norms, (b) intentionally, or subconsciously, challenging hegemonic notions of Black masculinity through their behaviors and self-beliefs, and (c) recognizing that their masculine identity(-ies) are influenced by other social factors and locations. Implications for researchers, counselors, and higher education practitioners are highlighted and recommendations for future research and theory are provided.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2162-3252
Print ISSN
2162-3244
Pages
pp. 83-110
Launched on MUSE
2013-03-28
Open Access
No
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