Abstract

Three early seventeenth-century “prodigal husband” comedies--The Wise-woman of Hogsdon (Thomas Heywood, c.1604), How a Man May Choose a Good Wife from a Bad (anonymous, c. 1600–1602), and The London Prodigal (anonymous, c. 1603–1604)--reveal how the gendered nature of credit relations in early modern England and the concomitant community surveillance of the household head could cause a newly-married young man to experience his new position of patriarchal authority as loss of autonomy, and to desire nothing so much as escape.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6547
Print ISSN
0013-8304
Pages
pp. 61-92
Launched on MUSE
2013-03-15
Open Access
No
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