Abstract

My analysis of A Long Way from Home (1937) subjects the memoir's closeted narrative to a poem collected in one of McKay's first publications, Constab Ballads (1912) as well as passages from his novel Home to Harlem (1928). A Long Way from Home takes steps to suppress its queer voice and proletarian presence. Though shadowy, such imprints may be traced-despite McKay's care in suppressing the entangled presences of "the love that dare not speak its name" and his onetime persistent dedication to Communism.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-658X
Print ISSN
0026-7724
Pages
pp. 714-745
Launched on MUSE
2003-12-16
Open Access
No
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