Abstract

Since the 1970s, some artists have self-consciously inhabited their workaday jobs as art; this "occupational realism" invokes questions about the performance of labor and the value of art-making. What does it mean to be (emotionally, physically, mentally) "occupied" by one's work? And what does it mean to "occupy" labor as a strategic artistic operation?

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Additional Information

ISSN
1531-4715
Print ISSN
1054-2043
Pages
pp. 32-48
Launched on MUSE
2012-11-29
Open Access
No
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