Abstract

This paper presents a framework informed by spatial models of politics to explain the dynamics of political competition in higher education policy and, in particular, the observed instability in the relationship between political variables and policy outcomes. To this end, I explore competing hypotheses for the relationship between government ideology and higher education spending decisions as well as test them using California data from 1976 to 2006. The results show that the growing polarization of ideological preferences explains, in part, shifts in states' policy priorities, leading to a gradual privatization of public higher education.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1538-4640
Print ISSN
0022-1546
Pages
pp. 769-794
Launched on MUSE
2012-10-24
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Archived
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.