Abstract

The American Scene and "The Jolly Corner" explore a question that has become increasingly important to both literary critics and cultural geographers: the rescaling of one's field of experience or analysis. James's writings on America describe a crisis of spatial scale brought about by increased urbanization, immigration, and international commerce following the Civil War. Architectural monstrosities, foreign "aliens," and economic growth all threaten his sense of proportion; but at times James foregoes his complaints about the country's inordinate scale in order to imagine a literature that could do it justice.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6555
Print ISSN
0273-0340
Pages
pp. 233-243
Launched on MUSE
2003-11-11
Open Access
No
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