Abstract

This article weaves together several lines of thinking in recent work on Euripides, in particular, his innovative approach to traditional dramatic and religious expression, and the overt theatricality of the Bacchae. To the first three choral odes, which are clearly modeled on hymn, should be added other parts of the play, especially its middle scenes (576–976). There, Euripides uses idioms of the theatre—dialogue, messenger speeches, and performance—to express the content found often in hymns, such as a god’s birth, nature, and blessings. At its culmination, this “dramatic hymn” offers an etiology of the Dionysia itself.

τὰ νομισθέντα γὰρ αἰεὶ Διόνυσον ὑμνήσω.

(“As has always been the custom, I will sing the hymn of Dionysus.”)

—Eur. Bacch. 71–72

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3168
Print ISSN
0002-9475
Pages
pp. 343-369
Launched on MUSE
2012-09-26
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.