Abstract

John Keats’s subject in Endymion is the imagination operating on the failed reader: the neutral or adolescent intellect that ultimately denies the transcendence it experiences; failing to mature, willfully remaining adolescent. Keats’s presentation of Endymion as “brain-sick” in this respect is thus a radical reinvention of the perpetually youthful Endymion in the Greek myth. Keats is keenly aware, moreover, of the built-in failure of his poem, a failure that remains true today; he cannot make readers recognize Endymion’s adolescent intellect as adolescent, much less recognize it as their own failed thinking.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-329X
Print ISSN
0190-0013
Pages
pp. 96-110
Launched on MUSE
2012-08-18
Open Access
No
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