Abstract

Tom Stoppard is not the sort of playwright one might call anti-intellectual, yet he has persistently singled out the field of academic philosophy for special assault in his plays. Stoppard’s antipathy emerges from a history of contention between the theater and philosophy in England, one that originates in Friedrich Nietzsche’s Birth of Tragedy and its particular reception at the hands of George Bernard Shaw. Stoppard offers an apotheosis of this disputation in his 1972 farce Jumpers, which imagines a marriage between a philosopher and an actress meant to demonstrate the superiority of the theater as a mode of speculative discourse.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-329X
Print ISSN
0190-0013
Pages
pp. 79-95
Launched on MUSE
2012-08-18
Open Access
No
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