Abstract

This article analyzes Amnesty International’s initial struggle to establish an American section. Amid the growing attention to Amnesty International in the scholarly literature, limited work exists on its national sections, including AIUSA, the American section. Understanding transatlantic disagreements about the efficacy of individual letter writing, funding, and the selection of prisoners of conscience illuminates the transferability of the Amnesty International model to the United States, the character of American human rights activism, and transatlantic relations among Amnesty’s nongovernmental actors. Furthermore, the strained relationship between Amnesty International and AIUSA reveals different conceptions of nongovernmental activism in the 1960s.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1085-794X
Print ISSN
0275-0392
Pages
pp. 779-799
Launched on MUSE
2012-08-02
Open Access
No
Archive Status
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