Abstract

This article examines the ways in which public discourse conceived spectatorship of digital cinema in the United States in the late 1990s. Evaluations of digital technologies' (actual or imminent) implications for spectatorship varied greatly, particularly across the diverse industrial and aesthetic traditions associated with digital cinema at that time. These competing discourses, however, evidence a shared tendency to conceptualize digital spectatorship according to a historically specific notion of transmission that mobilizes the concepts of intersubjectivity, embodiment, and immediacy.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1553-3905
Print ISSN
0892-2160
Pages
pp. 221-234
Launched on MUSE
2012-06-20
Open Access
No
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