Abstract

Insufficient attention has been paid to the political processes that take place between ratification of international human rights treaties and domestic implementation. Yet how international human rights treaties become embedded in domestic politics and local interpretations of compliance is crucial to understanding how international human rights treaties work in practice. Using evidence from three Latin American countries after the ratification of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, this article demonstrates how different implementation paths have unfolded, shaped by domestic actors and domestic politics.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1085-794X
Print ISSN
0275-0392
Pages
pp. 178-198
Launched on MUSE
2012-02-24
Open Access
No
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