Abstract

The fifth edition of Beauchamp and Childress's Principles of Biomedical Ethics is distinguished by its emphatic embrace of common morality as the ultimate source of moral norms. This essay critically evaluates the fifth edition's discussion of common morality and, to a lesser extent, its treatment of coherence (both the model of ethical justification and the associated concept). It is argued that the book is overly accommodating of existing moral beliefs. The paper concludes with three suggestions for improving this leading text.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3249
Print ISSN
1054-6863
Pages
pp. 219-230
Launched on MUSE
2003-09-11
Open Access
No
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