Abstract

Increasingly, Vietnam writers must confront criticism about the historical relevance of their topic. In response, they problematize closure, continuously projecting it into a utopian future. Three fantastic texts — Larry Heinemann's Paco's Story, Bruce McAllister's Dream Baby, and Lucius Shepard's "Shades" — explore, dramatize, and reify this trope of perpetually deferred closure. Respectively, they challenge the common assertion that repeated articulation leads to therapeutic self-recognition. They enable the reader to perceive dominant narrative conventions as aesthetically rather than mimetically grounded and to recognize their implicit ideological agenda.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1948-2833
Print ISSN
1948-2825
Pages
pp. 63-82
Launched on MUSE
2016-01-06
Open Access
No
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