Abstract

In a letter to Atticus defending the treatment of Scaevola in De oratore, Cicero appeals both to the example of Plato, "that god of ours," and to the memory of what the real Scaevola was actually like. Turning from the letter to De oratore itself, I show how this juxtaposition of Platonic divinity and Roman memory reflects a pattern present in the prefaces to each of the three books. I argue that Cicero presents his characters, in pointed response to Plato in general and the Phaedrus in particular, in such a way as to privilege history and oratory over philosophy.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2575-7199
Print ISSN
2575-7180
Pages
pp. 247-263
Launched on MUSE
2011-12-03
Open Access
No
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