Abstract

This study explored how first-generation Latino sophomores in a public research university describe the influence of Chicano Studies classes on their college transition experiences. Students reported that taking Chicano Studies offered them opportunities to handle feelings of isolation, build awareness of community heritage, develop more meaningful student-faculty relationships, and understand perspectives of people from different backgrounds. These processes enhanced their capacity to manage key developmental issues during their college transitions, including handling racism and forming a sense of community on campus. This study offers insights about how practitioners, researchers, and policymakers can address these students' experiences with campus diversity.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1543-3382
Print ISSN
0897-5264
Pages
pp. 639-655
Launched on MUSE
2011-11-23
Open Access
No
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